8 comments

  1. Gold need not always be the piece of hard metal, it can be someone we love, a captured scene or a keepsake that we treasure greatly. If we could see beyond material possession, we are already surrounded by precious gems in our daily life.

    1. Hello Windy dear,
      Wow! You took a wide view and saw more than most. And all you say holds very true.
      Luv and hugz,
      Eric

      Look beyond mere gold
      A love, memory, keepsake
      Precious gems in life

      While her husband, Danikan, was away on trade matters, Kavunthi lost all the family wealth to her relatives. They had cheated her. And she was terrified of what her husband would do to her. As the months ate away, she contemplated suicide. But she resolved to stay alive, tell him the truth, and face his wrath.

      When Danikan returned, he remained patient and heard her story. He did not shower her with anger. Instead, he took her into his arms and consoled her with soft loving words.

      ‘But we have nothing, my love,’ she said.

      ‘I have you, and that’s treasure enough,’ he replied.

      They embraced and looked forward to rebuilding their lives.

      Haiku & Story: Copyright @ Eric Alagan, 2018

    2. I simply love to read all the stories you conjure based on our comments. You are like an unending story book. If back in the old days where there is no TV, I think everyone will gather near the fire while you tell a story.

    1. LOL! That’s a new word coined, Ina.
      Cheers!
      Eric

      How much is enough
      A question all must address
      Great joy with sharing

      Devi and Lingam loved dining out, but they were not big eaters. They would frequent their favourite restaurant primarily to enjoy the ambience and the ever attentive service provided by the staff. The icing and attraction of these date nights: they loved and enjoyed one another’s company.

      Their dinners would stretch up to three hours as they tasted good food, great wine, and engaged in conversation. They talked about mundane matters; after twenty-five years together, they were past the lovey-dovey stage. They simply loved looking at one another across the table. The meal was a welcomed excuse.

      They would order generous portions and were always careful to set aside—they asked for extra plates—whatever they knew they could not finish.

      When time came to leave, they had the extra food packed in a neat box. They would give it to Mr Waite, the old fellow with a can in his hand, who was a fixture on the street corner.

      Haiku & Story: Copyright @ Eric Alagan, 2018

  2. Yes the acquisition of things just because others have those things can be a lifetime experience and it is so stupid if that’s the major goal in life. Nothing wrong with being rich and enjoying life because of your hard work. But you are talking about obsession in this statement. It is just like any other addiction.

    1. You are right, Ian,
      Nothing wrong with being rich. This haiku refers to obsession with accumulating riches.
      Have a great week ahead,
      Eric

      Wealth: Not the problem
      Obsession, addiction are
      Key: Moderation

      Rahim, Ling, and Sammy grew up to become successful businessmen. Having made their millions, by age forty, they sold their businesses, took care of their family needs, and indulged in their passion: travelling.

      Rahim travelled the world and, with the help of locals, planted trees—by the millions—in precincts stripped bare of greenery.

      Ling established cottage industries for women in remote parts of the world.

      Sammy brought light—literally—to many villages in Asia, Africa, and South America. He installed solar electrical power by the hundreds of megawatts.

      They won many awards and much recognition throughout the world. And books were written of their contributions and achievements.

      They became heroes of humanity.

      Haiku & Story: Copyright @ Eric Alagan, 2018

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