Short stories based on the Mahabharata.

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66 comments

  1. Hello Eric,

    Happy weekend.

    Pandu’s Folly – well, what a pleasurable way to die, LOL. Who is to fault him. Ironically that curse sort of backfired, he died a happy man. Why live long to suffer when you can end with a big bang. He was a great warrior and brought prosperity to his country and people. Glad you give him a memorable ending, Eric.

  2. Pancha Pandavas (The Five Pandavas) – Believe many can relate to why Pandu behaved irrationally when it concerns Madri, someone so dear to him. Regardless of what relationship is involved: parents and children, teacher and students, master and disciples, even god and mortals, very often there is a slightly more favoured one among the group. The true self of the affected will be revealed; his decisions and reactions. An interesting observation.

    You explored and exposed Pandu’s weakness very well, Eric.

  3. Hello Eric,

    Pandu abdicates the Throne – I am curious to know why Bhishma proposed for Dhristarashtra to be the caretaker king. Would it be fair to Dhristarashtra that Pandu can come back anytime to claim his seat? What is it that Bhishma sees in Pandu which he deems will make Pandu a better king that Dhristarashtra? Is it just because Dhristarashtra is blind or Bhishma sensed the greed in Sakuni’s influence?

    This episode is packed with many questions on where the story will lead to. Delightful read.

  4. Hello Eric,

    Pandu’s Curse – what a conflicting situation, this is both a curse and a blessing in disguise, depends on what is of greater significance to Pandu. Again, we see Satyavati’s lineage discontinued.

    Most people allowed gossips to affect their lives, even when they know that gossips change swiftly. A hero one day and the next day a villain. Sadly the consequence of becoming a victim to gossips is usually unpleasant.

    1. Hi Windy,

      You’re right. His curse is double-edged. According to the plot-line, he is infertile. It is not stated in Mahabharata but I added this “twist” to the curse. It gives an excuse as to why he had not had children and renders the story plausible.

      Ultimately, gossip hurts the perpetrator more than the victim, I reckon.

      Peace,
      Eric

    1. Hello Jane dear,

      Thank you for popping in 🙂 Trust all is well in your neck of the woods.

      Going flat-out to meet several (self-imposed) deadlines, leaving almost no time for blogging for now.

      Keep safe, keep well, lovely buddy,
      Eric

  5. Hi Eric,

    Pandu weds Kunti Devi – regardless of race and period, people with position of power often choose a spouse whose family are of the same or higher stature, to strengthen their alliance. Outside this marriage, they will have their own secret lovers.

    I agree with you that Madri comes across as lively, genuine and forthright. Wish she had found a better suitor than Pandu.

    1. Hi Windy,

      Natural selection in the wild and the wild (:-)) is the norm for a species’ survival. The ancients resorted to a caste system which arguably worked well at one time – but not anymore.

      In modern societies, the wealthy and powerful marry within their circles but that does not stop a driven person from gaining entry into their exclusive club. We’ve many self-made people as role-models. By that token, many once rich and powerful people have also fallen by the wayside. Arguably, modern societal norms are “better”. But there remain a large minority who continue to cling to “class”.

      In most Mahabharata stories, Madri is treated as a poor second to Kunti. Hopefully, my stories give credit due to her.

      Cheers!
      Eric

  6. Hi Eric,

    Kunti Devi – the rishi seems to come in a standard package, foul smell and temper, maybe has got to do with all the deprivations, LOLOL. I would have thought the astral travels, divine learning and accumulation of power are meant to extend mercy and forgiveness, impart knowledge of the higher realm and show kindness. Perhaps they march to a different call. Just as well, Kunti extracted a valuable gift.

    I like the way you depict the scene on Kunti’s divine conception, her innocence is rather endearing and amusing.

  7. Hello Eric,

    The Golden Age of Hastinapura – just as well Dhristarashtra is blind, otherwise he will have a hard time differentiating a hundred sons and remembering their names, LOL. I am curious how the boon works. Believe that scientifically it is not possible for Gandhari to physically birth so many children. Now if the children were not of Dhristarashtra’s genes, then I reckon they are not biologically linked to the Kuru line, and what the modern days will consider illegitimate. Ironically they are not of Satyavati’s lineage. The true lineage should be Yuyutsu – conceived by a low born Vaishya woman and his daughter, Duśśalā.

    Oh, I love these complicated relationship, so juicy and meaty, hahaha!

    1. Hi Windy,

      Yes, a hundred sons and a hundred names to remember. Moreover, I’m sure each of them had pet names and titles too. Name tags might have helped 🙂

      One version of the boon states that Gandhari gave birth to a lump of flesh. Vyasa appeared and advised her to cut the lump of flesh into a hundred pieces and place them in a hundred jars filled with ghee (clarified butter). The lumps grew, the jars broke and a hundred sons ensued. In keeping with my style and story flow, I ignored these “details”.

      As for lineage, if we applied modern norms, many of the actors in Mahabharata cannot claim direct descent from their acknowledged mortal parents.

      You’re right, the relationships lend impetus to the conflicts that follow.

      Cheers!
      Eric

  8. Hi Eric,

    How are you? Before moving on to my praising to you, I would like to ask you “How did you develop the interest on Indian Epic The Mahabharath? Where did this thought emerge from?”

    Being an Indian I’m mesmerized the way you explained. I’m overwhelmingly happy to read your short stories.
    You nailed in explaining the Epic Mahabharath as short as possible. There are many versions of this holy book but your short stories are fantastic!!!

    Almost every Indian is connected with the story of the Mahabarath. It’s not just a story but it’s a guide on how to lead the human life. It’s a diversified book and gives almost all qualities what human should possess to reach the God.

    Out of the world facts, Vyasa took 3 years to complete this Epic. You are doing an amazing work and profoundly explaining every phase in just 3 pages.

    My best wishes for your work. Cheers on having more than 1000 subscribers!!

    Kudos to your commitment.

    Astonished to have many western enthusiastic readers committed to read your short stories.

    1. Hi Nikhil,

      Thank you for your visit. I’m well and hope and trust that all is good with you and your loved ones.

      When I was a teenager and working with an old Chinese mechanic (a rough but deep thinking man), he got me interested in Tibetan Buddhism. That triggered an interest regarding the connections between the corporeal and ethereal realms. I’d devoured books on spiritualism ever since. My search led me to the Greek epics and Mahabharata and Ramayana. Not too long ago, I started on the Puranas.

      I’ve always wanted to write succinct stories to cater to people who lacked time. Now that I’m retired from the corporate world – I’ve some time for my passion. So, I’m indulging myself with reading, researching, writing and editing – and book publishing. I don’t enjoy the publishing chores but it comes with the territory.

      Many of my blogging friends from Europe, the Americas and Australia/NZ have read/studied the Mahabharata in school. Imagine that! I first learned of this in 2014 when I posted some Mahabharata posts. The response from the west was unexpected.

      You’re very right. There are many versions of the Mahabharata and rightly so because the epic lends itself to many interpretations. The different versions, penned by gifted writers who had come before us, provoke thought, reflection and self-discovery.

      Compared to that sea of human genius, my efforts are woefully pitiful. In this regard, your high praise humbles me and gives me impetus to do better.

      Thank you for your kind words and wishes. Thank you also for subscribing to my newsletter. I hope not to disappoint.

      All good wishes,
      Eric Alagan

  9. Hi Eric,

    Vidura the Avatar of Dharma – whether it is ancient time or current days, some things don’t change. When a person is ill-dressed, he is often judged guilty of misconduct or banditry in this case, sigh!

    Next is the person in authority, when he feels the person pleading is at his mercy, he will try to brush off his poor judgement with some excuse, hoping the person will go away. And they call themselves the Dispenser of Justice, what an irony!

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